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London. Photo: Shutterstock
London. Photo: Shutterstock

Places

London's hottest shopping area

For centuries, Scandinavians have headed to London for inspiration – and shopping. We guide you to the citys’ hottest and hippest shopping area. The historic spot that is Lamb’s Conduit Street in Bloomsbury has developed into a bastion of British independent fashion, with a focus on menswear.

Tucked away in a quiet part of central London, Lamb’s Conduit Street is village-y in feel and the stores lining it have an authentic, creative vibe about them. There is not a Tesco or Pret a Manger in sight, though a subtly branded J Crew store recently joined the likes of Universal Works, Folk, Darkroom, and Grenson.

Lamb’s Conduit Street is by no means sprawling, yet it should provide ample opportunity to fill the Christmas shopping basket. The street is also home to a number of cafés and restaurants serving anything from Iberian to Italian fare, while mulled wine can be had at The Lamb, one of London’s most charming Victorian pubs.

Darkroom.

Darkroom

Cult store Darkroom has a wide array of wares for men and women spanning jewelry, accessories, and objects for the home. Christmas present tips: cufflinks by Alice Made This and Darkroom’s own range of blankets (suitcase space permitting).

Darkroom

52 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Folk (left womenswear, right menswear).

Folk (menswear)

Folk was the first contemporary British label to set up shop on Lamb’s Conduit Street in 2007, and its cozy menswear store has set the tone for the rest of the street. This time of year, distinctive socks and knits abound.

Folk (menswear)

49 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Folk (left womenswear, right menswear).

Folk (womenswear)

One of London’s coolest multibrand shops is to be found in this disarmingly relaxed and unintimidating space. Pieces from Folk’s women’s line hang next to hard-to-find names such as Humanoid, Studio Nicholson, and Pomandere.

Folk (womenswear)

53 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Aesop.

Aesop

Australian skin care brand Aesop’s new store celebrates the history of the street: William Lamb founded a conduit in 1577 to bring clean water to the area. The innovative space, which has its own water system, could only have been dreamed up by the British design duo behind JamesPlumb.

Aesop

50 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Oliver Spencer

British designer Oliver Spencer is best known for his expertly cut shirts, but you’ll also find a full spectrum of men’s clothing, shoes and accessories in his two Lamb’s Conduit Street stores, as well as a small selection of womenswear.

Oliver Spencer

62 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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The Content Store.

The Content Store

The Content Store caters for the discerning man and his casual wardrobe. Clothing, accessories, footwear, and lifestyle products are sourced globally and the current crop includes Portuguese Flannel, lden, Garrett Leight, and Our Legacy.

The Content Store

28 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Holland Esquire

Nick Holland of Holland Esquire has won awards for his subtly quirky tailoring, His new pop-up store, which will remain open until spring, is fittingly distinctive. The furry creatures holding the fort are part of Holland’s personal taxidermy collection.

Holland Esquire

47 Lamb’s Conduit Street

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Grenson

British heritage shoe brand Grenson appeals to sartorial traditionalists and fashion mavens alike. The full range of men’s shoes is stocked and the store also houses a so-called G-lab station, inviting customers to personalize their purchase.

Grenson

40 Lamb’s Conduit Street

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The Lamb pub

The Lamb is one of central London’s few remaining authentic Victorian pubs. Etched glass snob screens are among its many original features, and the atmosphere makes it easy to conjure up an image of Charles Dickens seated at one of the tables, sipping a pint of beer. Other literary luminaries associated with The Lamb are Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. Mulled wine flows freely around Christmas time, alongside traditional ales. Food is also served.

The Lamb pub

94 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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Noble Rot restaurant and wine bar

Noble Rot has just swung open its doors, serving internationally sourced wines alongside “Franglais” dishes, created by the same chefs who brought Michelin-starred restaurant The Sportsman to fame.

Noble Rot restaurant and wine bar

51 Lamb’s Conduit Street, London

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The Hoxton Holborn hotel

An offshoot of the hip original that opened in Shoreditch in 2006, The Hoxton Holborn is equally young in feel. Corporate terminology is not favored here – when booking a room, choose between “Shoebox” or “Roomy”.

The Hoxton Holborn hotel

199–206 High Holborn, London

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Sir John Soane’s Museum

Sir John Soane’s Museum, the former home of the namesake neo-classical architect, is as quirky as it is significant. Left untouched for over 180 years, the space is brimming with Sir John’s diverse collection of sculptures, paintings, furniture, and antiquities.

Sir John Soane’s Museum

13 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London

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Last edited: August 11, 2017

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